Five Minute Friday: Truth

It’s time for Five Minute Friday.  Five minutes of unedited free writing based on a prompt.

This week’s word is truth.

Linking up again with Kate Motaung.

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Truth is the foundation that we build our days and future upon.

I’ve been concerned recently about the core beliefs that people have that wreck havoc with their lives.

I read a novel that was based on the premise that gender is a choice.  The implications of that belief?

Overwhelming.

We’re talking about 4 and 5 year old kids.  We’re talking about all the children that go to school together.  We’re talking about a whole generation of gender confused.  It’s mind boggling.

And that’s just one “truth” that is foundational to our future.

It’s time to re-examine the truths floating around and challenge them.

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What I’m Reading, May 2017

The lilacs have come and gone in our yard, and I didn’t get one picture of them.

My husband walked away from a serious car accident virtually uninjured.  We took a quick trip to PA for a wedding.  The school year is wrapping up with characteristic craziness.

Some great books read this month and one abandoned.

Linking up again with Modern Mrs. Darcy’s Quick Lit.

(Discosure:  This post contains affiliate links.  At no extra cost to you, a percentage of your purchase will go to support this site.)

  Buy now from Amazon

Everything I Never Told You

by Celeste Ng

I liked this book, although I wasn’t sure where it was going and didn’t know I liked it till the end.

It’s about a teenage girl who comes up missing.  Rarely have I read a novel that explores the family dynamic in such depth.  It felt believable.  It rang true.  You could feel the pain.  People do things for a reason and even extreme behavior can be understandable.

I wouldn’t say that the characters in this novel were relatable.  But, there was enough mystery to propel the novel forward and a fascinating tangle of human relationships.

It was a real case study in family systems.

  Buy now from Amazon

A Man Called Ove by Fredrik Backman

I can’t remember the last time a novel made me cry.  This one did.

Love, friendship, community and social awkwardness.  It’s the recipe for a great novel.

Ove is near the end of his life, but this novel takes us back to his family, his first love and his losses. It is a bittersweet exploration of what really matters in relationships and what gets in the way.

It demonstrates in brilliant colors that no man is an island.

  Buy now from Amazon

The Course of Love by Alain de Botton

This novel is an unusual look at marriage.  It traces the story of two fictional characters, but steps back to analyze and philosophize at intervals between the story.

I found it fascinating because the dynamic between husbands and wives are more complex than we give them credit.

Although I wouldn’t recommend this to young people because it does normalize non-traditional values, I found the interactions to be instructive.

   Buy now from Amazon

Liar and Spy by Rebecca Stead

I loved this book written for middle grades and I read it twice.

It gets five stars for being wholesome and a thumbs up for real heroes.  When I read middle grade, I find myself identifying with the teachers and principals.  Ha.

I loved the two families portrayed here and the real struggle with how twelve year olds deal with the heavy issues of life.

I liked her style.  I liked her characters.  I loved seeing the main character win the battles in his world.

This is How it always Is by Laurie Frankel

This is an exceptionally well-written novel.  I abandoned it, however, because it contradicts my world view.  I know there is a growing trend to accept the abnormal as normal and even to embrace it.  But, this is a dangerous trend.  It starts with presuppositions that aren’t true and builds on premises that aren’t true.  I feel that well-meaning people are genuinely deceived.

Books that normalize non-traditional values are not for me.  This is why I abandoned it.

What are you reading this month?

Stay tuned for my Summer Reading Guide for All Ages  Coming soon!

Five Minute Friday: Mom

Linking up with Kate Motaung’s Five Minute Friday.

This week’s prompt is “mom”.

On the eve of Mother’s Day, I struggle to think of something that hasn’t already been said repeatedly.

I wonder sometimes if motherhood has been over idealized somewhat.  Most of the work of mothering is routine, daily, unglamorous.

A lot of it is just work.

It’s a long term investment, because your two year old doesn’t thank you.  Your teenager doesn’t see the angst beneath the surface.

So, you have to be in it for the long haul, not the short term.

 

Who’s In Charge?

Who’s in charge?

The question has been echoing in my brain ever since my five year old niece asked me last month.

It was the first day of her parents’ 11 day absence.  I was filling in as caregiver, but I was the newbie.  She and her three sisters were getting me up to speed with how the system worked.  My biggest advantage was that I had the driver’s license.

So, I picked Charlotte up after school on the first day and she asked me flat out,  “Who’s charge?”  As if to say, let’s get the ground rules straight here:  where does the power lie? I was so stunned by the question, I don’t remember if I gave her a definitive answer.  I hope I did because it’s pretty important to win that battle up front.

But, it got me thinking.

I love, love, love setting goals.  I love new systems and “the answer to all life’s problems” and the new way of doing things that’s going to make All. The. Difference.

But, it often doesn’t work out.

I lose enthusiasm.  I drop the ball.  I don’t hit my goals.  I start over or give up.  I face insurmountable obstacles and get discouraged.  Life happens and things don’t work out.

And then I wonder again, “Who’s in charge?”

Is God in charge of my life or am I?  Am I the captain of ship or not?  Why bother to set goals if there’s a Higher Power moving the chess pieces?  How can I set goals that align with His agenda?

These are my questions.

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Coming Soon:  The Summer Reading Guide for All Ages.

Stay tuned.

 

 

Five Minute Friday: Should

Linking up again with Kate Motaung and Five Minute Friday.  This might become a habit.

This week’s prompt is should.

Should feels like a heavy weight, crushing and debilitating.

It restricts freedom.

It’s the weight of expectations that are too much to bear.

Sometimes, should serves a useful purpose.  It gives us the kick in the hind quarters to move into action and accomplish what is good and right.

Sometimes, though, it paralyzes with regret and shame.

Where is there room for grace?

How can we leverage the helpful side of should without being smashed by the weight?

 

50 Things I’ve Learned Since 1967

  1. Life is Difficult.
  2. People are complex.
  3. God is in control.
  4. Don’t get into a power struggle with a five year old.
  5. Make peace with routine.
  6. When you’re locked out of the house in your bathrobe, it’s okay to break the window.
  7. Writing 500 words a day is good for your emotional health.
  8. Sleep when the baby sleeps.
  9. There are seasons in life.  Some are harder than others.
  10. Gratitude is a habit you can cultivate.
  11. Guardian angels exist.  Toddlers make them work overtime.
  12. Introverts need to recharge alone.
  13. Eat frogs first thing in the morning.  Everything else will be downhill.
  14. Writing letters is a great antidote for loneliness.
  15. Music feeds the soul.
  16. Solitude is critical.
  17. Every decision is easier when you get on the same page first.
  18. Teamwork is hard.  Good teamwork is rare.
  19. Don’t forget to say “Thank you.”
  20. Put the oxygen mask on yourself before helping others.
  21. It’s great to have your Mom there when the new baby comes.                                                                             
  22. Give gifts to the older kids when the new baby comes.
  23. Going to childbirth class helps, but it won’t solve all the problems.
  24. There’s nothing that highlights your own selfishness like marriage.
  25. Many problems can be solved by research, trial and error, and asking the experts.
  26. Take it to the Lord in prayer.
  27. The power to forgive is supernatural.
  28. Invest in friendships.
  29. Pay attention.  Especially if there’s not many other people waiting for your flight.
  30. Plan for down time in your schedule.  It’s essential for your mental health.
  31. A library card is your golden ticket.
  32. Reading solves scads of problems, either by learning something that helps or escaping into a story.
  33. Hold children on your lap when you read to them.
  34. Leadership gives you a bigger audience for your mistakes.
  35. Staff to your weaknesses.
  36. Invite people over who can’t reciprocate.
  37. Celebrate small wins.
  38. Sometimes the hardest person to extend grace to is yourself.  Do it anyway.
  39. Sometimes you have to do it badly.
  40. There are worse vices than chocolate.
  41. There’s hope for the directionally challenged.
  42. As much as it depends on you, be at peace with everyone.
  43. You can’t do more than you can do.
  44. Ask for help.
  45. You can’t go anywhere with one foot on the gas and one foot on the brake.
  46. You can’t steer a parked car.
  47. If you’re the mother of the groom, wear comfortable shoes.

Five Minute Friday: More

Trying something new today.

Linking up with Kate Motaung and Five Minute Friday.

The prompt today is “more”.

Dave Ramsey had a great answer for a listener who wanted to know what the difference was between ambition and discontentment.

It’s something I’ve wondered about, too.

Dave made the point that selfish ambition is wrong, but ambition that isn’t selfish and doesn’t stem from discontentment is not wrong.

It’s possible to be ambitious for the right reasons and still be content.

Our desire for “more” can get us into trouble.

I guess, just like most of life’s challenges, it all comes back to heart issues.

What I’m Reading, April 2017

Wow.  What a month.

I stepped into my sister’s shoes and cared for her four daughters (ages 2 to 12) while she and her husband led a team to Israel.

I explored why I’m directionally challenged and what helps.

I went to Peru to catch up with my hubby who had already been in South America for a week.  It was a ministry trip that didn’t go as planned.  Our laptop got stolen, I missed my plane in Miami, massive flooding in Peru meant changes in itinerary and an unplanned visit in LA became one of the highlights of the trip.

Linking up with Modern Mrs Darcy’s Quick Lit.

(Disclosure: this post contains affiliate links. At no extra cost to you a percentage of your purchase will go to support this site.)

  Buy now from Amazon

A Portrait of Emily Price by Katherine Reay

I loved Katherine Reay’s first book, Lizzy and Jane.  Her second and third ones not so much.  I found this one to be slow moving.  By the end, I came to appreciate the setting and the plot was satisfying.  I can’t say I identified strongly with the characters or it was one of my all-time favorite books.

Emily Price is a professional restorer of art on assignment in Atlanta.  She meets Joseph and his brother, Ben, Italian natives that have family in Atlanta.  Emily discovers Ben and Joseph’s family differs quite a bit from her own and long buried family secrets are revealed.

  Buy now from Amazon

The Hardest Peace by Kara Tippetts

Kara’s bravery in the face of her own mortality is inspiring.

It’s hard for young children to lose their mother to cancer.  It feels unjust.  But, Kara’s acceptance of God’s will for her life showed the world what it means to believe that God is good, even when it doesn’t feel like it.

She faced the reality that her marriage wasn’t eternal.

I highly recommend this book to anyone struggling with God’s sovereignty.

 Buy now from Amazon

Hillbilly Elegy by J.D. Vance

The only thing I didn’t like about this book was gratuitous language.  Sometimes language in a dialogue can prove a point, but there’s no good reason for it to be in the narrative.

That being said, I love the social analysis wrapped around a boot-strapping overcomer’s story. J.D. Vance emerged from an impoverished childhood to graduated from Harvard and become a successful lawyer.

It has some similarities to Ben Carson’s story in Gifted Hands.

I love the positive impact and stability the author’s grandparents brought to his life.

My heart breaks for the young people in this country, especially for the homes that so many grow up in–for the poverty–not of money so much as love, stability, education and faith.

One thing that struck me is that the author wasn’t able to find much help in counseling, but research, learning and understanding about himself and his formative years brought a measure of peace.

 Buy now from Amazon

An Invisible Thread by Laura Schroff and Alex Tresniowski

“The true story of an 11-year-old panhandler, a busy sales executive, and an unlikely meeting with destiny.”

An inspiring story, well told.

An Invisible Thread is a story that I’ve been wanting to read for a long time.   This is another book that made me get philosophical.  The culture of poverty at work again.  And, once again, it’s not so much about the money.  It’s the opportunities, the education, even the relationships that are poor.  And that plays out into material lack.  The whole mindset has to change.  The way you believe about yourself has to change.  The way you believe about your destiny has to change:  are you a victim of your circumstances or do you control your fate?

Laura Schroff reached out to Maurice in a gesture of friendship and began a relationship that endured three decades.  She nurtured her unexpressed maternal instinct.  He grabbed a lifeline out of a culture of poverty. It’s interesting that one thing read more

  Buy now from Amazon

The Girl with No Name by Diney Costeloe

Lisa Becker was a German Jew escaping Hitler’s regime seeming sanctuary in England.  Torn from her family at age 14, the struggle to love trust and suffer loss follows her.  She faces the uncertainty of life during war time.

I liked this book.  It made me wonder about how we deal with loss, especially how children deal with loss.  Although a work of fiction, it highlighted the heroism and sacrifice of the British people during World War II.

Strangers giving homes to children is a beautiful thing.  What makes a community?  What makes a family? My mind always strays to the philosophical.

Highly recommended.

   Buy now from Amazon

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis by Izabella Wentz

This is a very through tome.  And although it ‘s written conversationally for laymen, there are parts that made my eyes glaze over.

Have read a lot of Izabella’s articles on the internet and implementing her advice, based on my experience and her recommendations, I suggest these first steps:

  1. Eliminate gluten.  This has been found to benefit a high percentage of Hashimoto’s sufferers.  It has certainly helped me.
  2. Take selenium supplements.  Start with 200 mpg and work up to 400 mpg.  Take on an empty stomach paired with Vitamin E for best absorption. I’m taking quite a few supplements and I’m convinced that this one is helping the most.
  3. Buy the book.  Yes, this is a shameless plug.  Brain fog, short term memory loss and difficulty focusing and concentrating are symptoms of Hashimoto’s, so you might need to read more                                                                                                                                                  What are you reading this month?

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis by Izabella Wentz

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis by Izabella Wentz

This is a very through tome.  And although it ‘s written conversationally for laymen, there are parts that made my eyes glaze over.

Have read a lot of Izabella’s articles on the internet and implementing her advice, based on my experience and her recommendations, I suggest these first steps:

  1. Eliminate gluten .  This has been found to benefit a high percentage of Hashimoto’s sufferers.  It has certainly helped me.
  2. Take selenium supplements.  Start with 200 mpg and work up to 400 mpg.  Take on an empty stomach paired with Vitamin E for best absorption. I’m taking quite a few supplements and I’m convinced that this one is helping the most.
  3. Buy the book.  Yes, this is a shameless plug.  Brain fog, short term memory loss and difficulty focusing and concentrating are symptoms of Hashimoto’s, so you might need to take it slow.  Bite sized pieces of advice from her blog are helpful, too, if you can’t handle too much at once.                                                                                                                                                            I found the book especially helpful for putting things in context and for understanding how complex this disease is.

Apparently, parasites and bacteria feed on starches and sugars and starving them is one way to get rid of them.  Antibiotics are another way.

I took two tests that confirmed that I had Hashimoto’s.  My TSH (Thyroid Stimulating Hormone) fell in the normal range.  My TPO was elevated.

I highly recommend this book to anyone suffering with Hashimoto’s.

 

A Portrait of Emily Price by Katherine Reay

I loved Katherine Reay’s first book, Lizzy and Jane.  Her second and third ones not so much.  I found this one to be slow moving.  By the end, I came to appreciate the setting and the plot was satisfying.  I can’t say I identified strongly with the characters or it was one of my all-time favorite books.

Emily Price is a professional restorer of art on assignment in Atlanta.  She meets Joseph and his brother, Ben, Italian natives that have family in Atlanta.  Emily discovers Ben and Joseph’s family differs quite a bit from her own and long buried family secrets are revealed.